2014-08-27 : 7 notes


184game:

today at work i wrote a readme file.

a readme file……..


2014-08-26 : 35,725 notes


Anonymous said: i had a dream about magical girls that had super strength/agility, but instead of wearing a special outfit they would shed their skin and turn into a skeleton.

iguanamouth:

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Best thing ever. Please, somebody turn this into an animated series!


2014-08-22 : 59,880 notes


check-your-privilege-feminists:

Tumblr social justice: spreading the world apart instead of bringing us together, one group at a time.

(via whythatsbullshit)


2014-08-20 : 218 notes


cinephiliabeyond:

Out-of-print Criterion LaserDisc/DVD audio commentary for The Silence of the Lambs by Jonathan Demme, Jodie Foster, Anthony Hopkins, Ted Tally, and FBI agent John Douglas. “It’s an almost perfect example of the multi-participant track: each of the five participants has something to bring to the table. They all treat the film and subject with respect and therefore have things to say that go well beyond the movie. The FBI guy gives credibility to the track and gives his comments on capital punishment and the thoughts that go through the heads of serial killers. Nothing on this track is redundant, the pace and voices are perfect. And let this commentary be a lesson to other commentators. Just talking for two hours doesn’t make it good. You have to have something to say. And they certainly do here. Outstanding!” RateThatCommentary

Academy Award-winning screenwriter Ted Tally gives a provocative look at the adaptation and production of the Oscar-winning film The Silence of the Lambs. Tally covers it all: working with director Jonathan Demme, anticipating Jodie Foster’s Oscar win, the delicious changed ending for the world’s most famous cannibal, Hannibal Lecter, and more.

It’s a constant mind game that you’re playing with the audience, a game of trying to anticipate their expectations and surprise them. Jonathan Demme says, ‘It’s better to confuse the audience for a couple of minutes than to bore them for a couple of seconds.’ You always want to be a little ahead of them, but not so far ahead of them that it seems snarky. —Ted Tally

Dear every screenwriter, read this: Ted Tally’s screenplay for The Silence of the Lambs  [Wisconsin Screenwriters Forum, pdf]. (NOTE: For educational purposes only). The DVD/Blu-ray of the film is available at Amazon and other online retailers.

Hello. The party you have called is unavailable at the moment. This is Anthony Hopkins, or Hannibal Lecter, if you prefer. I would be very happy to take your message. In fact, I insist. When the last person who failed to do so, I ate his liver with some fava beans and a nice chainti. So please, leave your name and number after the beep. Oh… and pleasant dreams, by the way. —Anthony “Hannibal” Hopkins in one of the strangest bits of promotional material available

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

Hey, here’s another one. Silence of the Lambs, another masterpiece. Check it all out!


2014-08-20 : 81 notes


cinephiliabeyond:

In one of his best interviews, Sidney Lumet discusses his directing style developed over 50 years of filmmaking including such noteworthy films as 12 Angry Men, Long Day’s Journey Into Night, Dog Day Afternoon and Network. Due to the length of the interviews, they have been divided into chronological chapters for easier viewing. To view a chapter and see its full transcript, click on the thumbnails.

The cinematography concept of Network was wonderful and Owen Roizman carried it brilliantly. Since it was a film about corruption, we would corrupt the camera. There was a realistic look with William Holden and Peter Finch in the beginning, by the end of the movie it looked like a Ford commercial. It was so gorgeous, it looked like A Man and a Woman, we just gradually made the film look gorgeous. I never liked to see any of this happening. My objection to a lot of work is the stuff that draws attention to itself. I like to sit back and let it hit me. A lot of what I see that I don’t like is the stuff that draws attention to itself. In Network we stretched it over 2 hours so you never see it happening. The original ad for Network was one of the best ads I’ve ever seen. Manhattan skyline with TV cameras with Peter Finch on a cross. The copy said “The greatest story ever sold.” Great ad. Arthur Krim put up money. By the time picture came out all that was left was the lightning bolt. Literally. Just the lightning bolt. —Sidney Lumet

Network (1976) was written by Paddy Chayefsky (1923-1981). Chayefsky said he didn’t write the film as an attack on the television industry (“it’s not a brutal attack, maybe a murderous attack, but not brutal,” he laughs in the interview), he just described the world as he saw it around him. He wants to get a message across but if it happens it’ll be a bonus. First and foremost the story has to be entertaining. Chayefsky won the Oscar for Best Writing for Network. Howard Beale’s moving speech is timeless: the problems are as relevant today as they were when the film was made. Script of the Week: Network

Below: the shooting script for Network. Howard Beale’s “Mad as Hell” speech was filmed on day 1. —via Dave Itzkoff

Another rarity from the archives: 1st draft of Network, 1st page: “This story is about Howard Beale…” —via Dave Itzkoff

Dear every screenwriter, read this: Paddy Chayefsky’s screenplay for Network [pdf]. (NOTE: For educational purposes only). The DVD/Blu-ray of the film is available at Amazon and other online retailers. Absolutely our highest recommendation.

Dave Itzkoff’s marvelous book Mad as Hell: The Making of Network and the Fateful Vision of the Angriest Man in Movies is a must-have on your shelf. Purchase your copy at Amazon.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

Network is one of the greatest films of all time. Check this all out, watch the film, show it to everybody. Go!


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